The Primate Society Council

Professor Joanna M Setchell

Durham University, is the PSGB President and a member of Council. Jo has worked on sexual selection, life history and reproductive strategies in primates for more than 20 years. She also promotes an interdisciplinary biosocial approach to the study of human/ primate interactions, and biodiversity conservation, encouraging biologists to collaborate with social scientists to understand human dimensions of conservation. Jo has been Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Primatology since 2009. She has served two terms as Vice-President (Research) of the International Primatological Society (2010-14, 2014-18). She joined PSGB in 1996 when she started her PhD, has been on council several times, and served on the Conservation Working Party 2007-16. You can find more information about her here. You can contact Jo by emailing


Dr Lewis Dean

is the PSGB General Secretary and a member of Council. Lewis is a senior policy manager in RCUK’s public engagement with research team. His research has focussed on social learning, innovation, teaching and the evolution of cumulative culture in a variety of primate species including chimps, capuchins, lemurs and humans. He has experience working for a learned society in education and outreach roles, and has produced his own science shows examining primate cognition. More information can be found on his website and he can be contacted by emailing


Brian R Machin

is the Treasurer of the PSGB and is a member of Council. Brian’s particular interests include conservation and platyrrhine evolution.  His current research is into the measurement of extant primate disparity – comparing both morphological differences with genetic variations. You can contact Brian by emailing


Dr Jean Phillipe Boubli

University of Salford, is a PSGB council member. He is interested in Ecology, Biogeography and Conservation of New World Primates. He is a member of the Primate Specialist Group and a contributor to the IUCN red list since 2007. You can contact Jean by emailing and find out more about his research here.


Ellie Donnelly

University of Durham, is the PSGB Student representative and a member of Council. She is an ESRC funded MA/PhD student interested in comparative human and non-human primate cognition and communication and how this can inform our understanding of the evolution of language and cumulative culture. You can contact her by emailing


Dr Laura Fitton

University of York, Hull York Medical School, is a member of Council. She is interested in Primate Diets, Functional Morphology, Virtual Anthropology, Biomechanics and Evolutionary Anatomy. She is on the editorial board for Folia Primatologica and Programme Director for the MSc Human Anatomy and Evolution. More information can be found on her university webpage. You can contact Laura by emailing


Dr Paul Honess

is the Convenor of the Captive Care Working Party and a member of Council. Paul's research aims to improve the welfare of captive animals.  You can contact Paul by emailing


Dr Juliane Kaminski

University of Portsmouth, Department of Psychology, Centre for Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology, is a member of Council. She is interested in Primate social cognition, cooperation and communication. She is on the editorial board for PLOS ONE and PeerJ. More information can be found on her university webpage. You can contact Juliane by emailing 


Dr Nicola Koyama

Liverpool John Moores University, Primatology Research Group, is a member of the Council. She is interested in how group-living individuals regulate their social relationships; cooperation and conflict; the social and environmental factors affecting relationships. Nicola teaches on the MSc Primate Behaviour & Conservation. More information can be found on her university webpage.


Jaimie Morris 

Canterbury Christ Church University, is a member of Council. She is a life sciences instructor and PhD student. Her research focuses on the morphological and genetic regional variation of the western lowland gorilla. She has an interest in science outreach programs and has developed and delivered biology-based activities to a wide range of students. You can contact Jaimie by emailing


Prof Kate Robson Brown 

Bristol University, is a member of Council. Kate’s broad research interests include primate musculo-skeletal anatomy, functional morphology, evolutionary biomechanics and the relationship between the microarchitecture of bone, pathology, and biomechanical loading in life. More information can be found on her university webpage.


Dr Caroline Ross

University of Roehampton, is a member of Council. She joined the Society in 1984 and was Honorary Secretary from 1993-1996. Caroline’s research focuses on socioecology and human/wildlife interactions. She is a Director of baboon research at Gashaka Gumti National Pak in Nigeria and teaches primatology on the University of Roehampton’s Anthropology and Zoology BSc programmes and on the MRes Primate Biology Behaviour and ConservationMore information can be found on her web page. You can contact Caroline by emailing 


Dr Amanda Webber

Bristol Zoological Society, is a PSGB council member. She is interested in human-wildlife interactions with a particular focus on non-human primates in agricultural landscapes.  She is a member of IUCN SSC Primate Specialist Group Madagascar Section.  You can find out more information here and you can contact Amanda by emailing 


Dr Claire Witham

Newcastle University and MRC Centre for Macaques, is a PSGB council member. Her research focusses on the welfare of captive primates, with particular interest in the automated monitoring of behaviour including sleep. More details can be found here


Other members of the PSGB team

Dr Emily Bethell

Liverpool John Moores University, is the PSGB Scientific Meetings Officer. Emily’s broad research interest is social cognition and behaviour. Emily studies primates in the wild and in captivity to identify markers of psychological wellbeing and develop methods to improve welfare in captivity. More information can be found on her personal research pages. You can contact Emily by emailing or


Dr Mary Blanchard

University of Birmingham, is the PSGB Membership Secretary (Assistant Treasurer) and archivist. Mary researches the locomotor ecology of wild lemurs and captive primates. You can contact Mary by emailing or


Louise Cox

is PSGB's marketing officer along with Emma. Louise completed a BSc in Animal Science, with a placement year at Paignton Zoo conducting nutrition based research. Her main interests lie within captive animal care, particularly nutrition, human animal interactions and animal cognition. You can contact Louise by emailing or 


Dr Caroline Harcourt

Convenor of the Conservation Working Party and an assistant member of Council. Caroline did her MSc and PhD on galagos in South Africa and Kenya respectively and has worked on lemurs. She authored the IUCN Red Data Book on lemurs, has edited books on primates and tropical forests and is editorial assistant for Folia Primatologica. She is a trustee of the Welsh Mountain Zoo. You can contact Caroline by emailing


Emma Horton

is PSGB's marketing officer, with Louise. Emma has worked with primates in captivity for over 7 years, currently working at Paradise Wildlife Park as head of Primates with species including callitrichids, squirrel monkeys, lemurs and gibbons. Prior to this Emma completed a degree in Zoology at The University of Manchester. She currently sits on the EAZA Lar gibbon EEP species committee. You can contact Emma by emailing or 


Dr Tracie McKinney

University of South Wales, is the Book Reviews Editor for Primate Eye.  Tracie’s work focuses on anthropogenic habitat disturbance, and ways that wild primates deal with these challenges.  More information can be found on her university webpage, and you can contact Tracie at


Professor Bridget M. Waller

University of Portsmouth, is the Convenor of the Research Working Party. Bridget’s research focuses on human and non-human primate social communication, particularly facial expression. She uses modifications of the Facial Action Coding System (FACS) for anatomical comparisons in facial expression across species. More information can be found on her university webpage. You can contact Bridget by emailing